o! Shark Fartsicles

A blog, like any other on the tumblesphere. Content revolves around art, literature, theatre, cool photos of beautiful androgynous people, dog butts, TV I don't have time to watch, rants about a graduate's life, and some other myriad crap that comes long my interwebular experience. COME, let's procrastinate together.
other-wordly:

pronunciation | tsUn-‘dO-kU submitted by | chrysalismm submit words | hereJapanese script | 積ん読 kanji, つんどく hiragana

fuck my life, that’s me.

other-wordly:

pronunciation | tsUn-‘dO-kU 
submitted by | chrysalismm
submit words | here
Japanese script | 積ん読 kanji, つんどく hiragana

fuck my life, that’s me.

Genderqueer Links and Books ›

gqid:

subtlecluster:

Genderqueer Links and Books

The following are link and book recommendations, all evaluated myself, as helpful resources that relate to genderqueer and non-binary concepts and identities. If there is a resource you would like to suggest, please use the GQID submit form (select Submit a Link from the drop-down or copy and paste a list into the default text box). See also Marilyn Roxie’s genderqueer tag on Delicious. If you are instead looking for the bibliography for the Genderqueer History and Identities project, click here.

     Links:

Genderqueer-friendly Tumblrs

Androgynites UniteAnything But BinaryAsk a Non-BinaryBreak the BinaryLGBTQ AdviceFat Genderqueers!Fuck Yeah Androgyny!Fuck Yeah Bigender!Fuck Yeah GenderlessFuck Yeah Gender Studies!Fuck Yeah, Genderqueers!Fuck Yeah, Transitioning GQsthe gender bender agendaThe Gender BookGenderforkrGenderPanicGender QueeriesGenderqueerThe Genderqueer ActivistGenderQueer ConfessionsGenderqueer FashionistaGenderqueer ProblemsGQ MomentsKNOW HomoLGBTQ ConnectionsNeutroisNonbinaryNon-binary ArtistsNonbinary Autistics!Non Binary ConfessionsNon-Binary FolkNon-Opno gender rulesnullgradePractical AndrogynyQueer DictionarySmashing the BinaryspectrumofgendersSTFU BinaristsT.R.A.N.S.Transcending AnatomyTrans*OpinionsTrans* TransgressionsTrans* Tumblr DirectorytransbearsTransFessTRANSPRIDEygender[queer]

GQ-friendly Livejournal Communities

AndrogynesBigenderBirlsGender Blurgender_fluidGenderqueerGender.queer_FTWGirlfags and GuydykesTransgender

Websites and FAQs

Androgyny Rarely Asked QuestionsChroanagramCrossdreamersGenderforkGenderologyGenderpediaGenderqueer in the UKGenderQueer RevolutionGender SphereThe Midwest Trans & Queer Wellness InitiativeNonbinary.orgNon-Op: Another Optionpipisafoat: FAQ on Genderqueers, Gender Expression, and Gender VariancePractical AndrogynyQuestioning TransphobiaT-VoxWe Happy TransWorld Professional Association for Transgender HealthYGender

Organizations and Events: Click here for a list

Forums and Groups

AVEN: Gender DiscussionForum GenderQueer (Russian), Last.fm: Genderqueers GroupLaura’s PlaygroundScarleteen: Gender IssuesSusan’s PlaceTransYadaWhat is Gender?

Identity Sites

Androgyne OnlineBigenderBi-Gender the Bisexual PartnerGirlFagsNeutrois.com/Neutrois OutpostNeutrois Nonsense

Prounouns and Titles

Art of Transliness: Gender Neutral Relational TermsFreelance Writing: The History of the Indefinite Singular PronounGender Neutral Pronoun BlogGender Queeries: Gender Neutral/Queer TitlesGenderqueer in the UK: Misc, or Mx: A Gender-neutral TitleMIT’s Ally Toolkit: Gender Neutral Pronoun UsageWarren Wilson: Using Gender-Neutral Language in Academic Writing

Articles: Click here for a list

Fun, Videos, Podcasts, & Performance

Agender EarthwormFacts About Queers (Humor), Fuck Yeah Non-Binary SeahorseGenderqueer ChatGendercast: Our Transmasculine GenderqueeryGender Queeries,Kreative Korporation: Yay genderform! (a comprehensive and fun-to-play-with list of gender, sex, orientation, and more identities), Midwest Genderqueerregender: A Different Kind of TranslatorTrans ParrotfishTrans Parrotfish’s Significant Other

Education

Gender Diversity ProjectGender Spectrum: ResourcesQueer Teaching TipsSafe Schools CoalitionTRANScending Identities: A Bibliography of Resources on Transgender and Intersex TopicsTransgender Student RightsTrans What?: A Guide Towards Allyship

Sex EdClick here for a list

The Trevor Project: “The leading national organization providing crisis intervention and suicide prevention services” to LGBT youth: 866-4-U-TREVOR (866-488-7386) Also available for matters of less pressing urgency, Dear Trevor is an “online, non-time sensitive Question & Answer resource for young people with questions surrounding sexual orientation and gender identity.” A directory of previous questions in the category of Transgender/Genderqueer is also available.

Social Media

Click here for a list of social media with options apart from male and female, as well as scripts to alter options on websites that don’t provide these options by default

Fashion and Transitional GearClick here for a list

Banner: This Journal is Gay/Lesbian, Bisexual, Pansexual, Transgender, Intersex, Genderqueer, Asexual Positive banner (with flagswithout flags). Designed by nethdugan.

     Books: 

Note: Use Worldcat.org, the world’s largest global library catalog, to see if the book you’re seeking is available at a library near you!

Gender Now Coloring Book - Maya Christina Gonzales

Gender Outlaw: On Men, Women and the Rest of Us - Kate Bornstein

Gender Outlaws: The Next Generation - Kate Bornstein

Hello, Cruel World: 101 Alternatives to Suicide for Teens, Freaks, and Other Outlaws - Kate Bornstein

My Gender Workbook: How to Become a Real Man, a Real Woman, the Real You, or Something Else Entirely - Kate Bornstein

Books and essays by Ivan Coyote

Grrl Alex: A Personal Journey to a Transgender Identity - Alex Drummond

GenderQueer: Voices From Beyond the Sexual Binary - Joan Nestle, Riki Wilchins, Clare Howell

Nobody Passes: Rejecting the Rules of Gender and Conformity - Mattilda Bernstein Sycamore

PoMoSexuals: Challenging Assumptions About Gender and Sexuality - Carol Queen and Lawrence Schimel

Queer Theory, Gender Theory - Riki Anne Wilchins

Read My Lips: Sexual Subversion and the End of Gender - Riki Anne Wilchins

Trans Bodies, Trans Selves (in-progress) - Laura Erickson-Schroth

whatever.odt (free!) - JD O’Meara

Feeling Wrong in Your Own Body: Understanding What It Means to Be Transgender - Jamie A. Seba

That’s Revolting!: Queer Strategies for Resisting Assimilation - Mattilda Bernstein Sycamore

Transgender Voices: Beyond Women and Men - Lori B. Girshick and Jamison Green

Transition and Beyond: Observations on Gender Identity - Reid Vanderburgh

(Looking for a list of books concerning gender, sex, and orientation that aren’t genderqueer specific instead? Click here)

Book lists compiled by others:

Bibliography of Books Concerning Androgynes and Androgyny

Booklist for Trans Youth on Goodreads

Genderqueer Chicago on Goodreads

I’ve updated this yet again on site and used the reblog post format that subtlecluster had put up to share it - keep sharing and suggesting more resources that I should include!

time to get readin’

(via fuckyeahfeminists)

visual-poetry:

“1909-2011” by fiona banner

[97 jane’s all the world’s aircraft books]

ianbrooks:

Weapon of Mass Instruction

Built from a welded frame atop a 1979 Ford Falcon, Raul Lemesoff drives around the streets of Buenos Aires distributing free books to anybody who wants to be assaulted with some serious learnin’.

(via: make / laughingsquid)

(via fuckyeahbookarts)

photojojo:

This DIY camera was made from a stack of books on photography. Heh.

It’s part of Taiyo Onorato and Nico Krebs’ photo book titled As Long As It Photographs It Must Be a Camera.  More at American Photo at the link!

DIY Camera Made from Photography Books

Thanks Dan for the heads up!

dyingofcute:

“She had the perpetual sense, as she watched the taxi cabs, of being out, out, far out to sea and alone; she always had the feeling that it was very, very, dangerous to live even one day.”
Virginia Woolf - Mrs. Dalloway

dyingofcute:

“She had the perpetual sense, as she watched the taxi cabs, of being out, out, far out to sea and alone; she always had the feeling that it was very, very, dangerous to live even one day.”

Virginia Woolf - Mrs. Dalloway

kylamccallum:

This piece was created by Kyla McCallum for a project mentored by the German Fashion Designer Eva Gronbach in Cologne, 2007. The skirt holds 67 books with a total of 20,000 pages, each one folded by hand. Photography by Natascha Aplas.

To see some more of Kyla’s work go to…

http://kylamccallum.tumblr.com/

http://thelittlepocketbook.tumblr.com/

William Blake: Songs of Innocence & Experience

siliconmenagerie:

A rare book collector managed to find a copy of William Blake’s masterful Songs of Innocence & Experience and scan the book in its entirety.  I found these images online a while back, and since it looks like the site is no longer hosting these files, I think it’s safe to post.

Download complete book (Zip Archive)

Favourite Books of 2011 - John’s Picks

drawnblog:

2011 was another great year for books. As has become an annual tradition here are my favourite books from the past year, just in time for your holiday shopping — every one of these, perfect for the cartoon/illustration/design nerd on your list. Or get yourself a little something. Treat yourself.

Nobrow 6

Okay, I’m a little biased because I am contributor to this hefty and colourful book (as is Drawn’s Matt Forsythe). But even if I weren’t a contributor this would top my list. Nobrow expanded their biannual art magazine to a magnificent double issue, now with comics, named, fittingly, The Double. The entire thing is masterfully produced using Nobrow’s signature attention to the printing process. And that lineup! Tom Gauld, Michael DeForge, Gemma Correll, Joseph Lambert, Kevin Huizenga, Luke Pearson, and a zillion others.

Hark! A Vagrant by Kate Beaton

Not much can be said about Kate’s comics that hasn’t already been said this year. Her monstrously successful release and tour of this book, a collection of her best and most hilarious strips from her webcomic of the same name, is inspiring to anyone who creates content on the web.

I Want My Hat Back by Jon Klassen

A perfect (yes, perfect) picture book. Jon Klassen’s artwork is both lush and minimalist, and his writing is succinct and hilarious. Your kids’ eyes will widen, as will their smiles, when their little brains figure out the grisly (yes, pun intended) ending.

The Death Ray and Mister Wonderful by Daniel Clowes

2011 gave us two hardcover Daniel Clowes books, so that’s pretty alright, huh? I didn’t read The Death Ray in its original incarnation as Eightball issue 23, nor did I read Mister Wonderful when it was serialized in the New York Times Magazine. I’m clearly in the “wait until it comes out as a book” camp.

Mister Wonderful is Clowes’s most understated work. It may not be as funny as his usual output, but that doesn’t stop the main character from letting Clowes express his usual neurotic, cynical voice.

The Death Ray is a masterful non-superhero superhero story, and a rare graphic novel (if 42 pages sandwiched between two pieces of book board can actually be called a novel) that made me want to re-read it the minute I finished. Clowes is increasingly becoming the cartoonist I most want to study and dissect. I am constantly asking “how did he do that?” when I’m reading his work.

Paying For It by Chester Brown

Chester Brown’s autobiographical graphic novel about his experiences with prostitutes is surely the year’s most polarizing cartoon book. But regardless of your opinions on the subject matter, there is no question Chester is a powerhouse of a cartoonist. There’s no reason such a dense hefty book should be such a swift read — a testament to his talents as both a writer and a draftsman. His careful precise drawings are practically typographic, and any given panel reads as natural as words.

Everything Goes On Land by Brian Biggs

You can read my original review of Everything Goes on Land, but trust me — this is what you give to a kid when you want him to get lost in a book for a few hours in the other room. It is packed with fun drawings and enough details and interactive scavenger hunts to keep a car-and-truck loving kid occupied for days.

The Great Northern Brotherhood of Canadian Cartoonists by Seth

From my original review:

I unabashedly love Seth’s new book, The Great Northern Brotherhood of Canadian Cartoonists. It’s a prequel of sorts to Wimbledon Green, and sets the scene and describes the world in which Seth’s made-up history of Canadian cartooning and comics takes place.

NFB Animation Express 2

This is the one non-book entry to this list. I have such nostalgic feelings for NFB animation collections. As a kid I’m pretty sure I wore out every VHS tape with The Cat Came Back or The Big Snit on it. The latest in this tradition is Animation Express 2. It’s a bit of a mixed bag, as these things always are, but the NFB produces some truly great animation and my favourites are Patrick Doyon’s Sunday, Marv Newland’s experimental and abstract CMYK and Amanda Forbis & Wendy Tilby’s marvelous Wild Life.


Amazing Everything by Scott C.

From my original review:

Scott manages to infuse each brushstroke, each little dude with happiness, optimism, and joy. His is a refreshing and original voice in the world of picture-making, and this book is a sure-fire pick-me-up, reminding everyone who reads it just how fun drawing can be.

Comics Class by Matthew Forsythe

Drawn’s own Matt Forsythe released two splendid books this year. The most recent is Comics Class from Koyama Press, which makes its official debut this weekend at the Brooklyn Comics and Graphics Festival. The strips, inspired my Matt’s experiencing teaching comics to kids, are so funny it makes me wonder why he doesn’t do more non-wordless comics.

My Name is Elizabeth by Annika Dunklee and Matthew Forsythe

My Name is Elizabeth is Matt’s first picture book, and I’m not surprised it was a New York Times notable kids book. Matt’s two-toned gouache illustrations perfectly compliment the playful story about a young girl who expresses her displeasure with people taking liberties with her name.

Forming by Jesse Moynihan

From my original review:

Forming is an epic sci-fi creation myth that will have you chuckling like an idiot. Get a taste of the webcomic version, then add this bad boy to your bookshelf.

The First in Line by Mattias Adolfsson

Mattias’s effortless-looking sketchbook drawings are some of my favourite things to invade my Google Reader (his blog is here), and this independently-published collection is a great way to view every detailed ink line and watercolour splotch.

I Will Bite You by Joseph Lambert

Joe Lambert is one of my favourite cartoonists, and we’re seeing just the beginning of what will be a very interesting career. I Will Bite You is a collection of short comics pieces, each one showcasing Joe’s beautiful sketchy pen lines and poetic treatment of the medium. And just check out his sketchbooks on his blog.

Saul Bass: A Life in Film and Design by Jennifer Bass and Pat Kirkham

The oft-imitated Saul Bass is probably cited as an influence by more graphic designers than any other figure. So it’s surprising that this is the first book dedicated to his work. You know him best for his title sequences and posters for movies like Vertigo and Anatomy of a Murder, and his identity work, designing some of the world’s most well-known logos (AT&T, Kleenex, United Way, Quaker Oats, and United Airlines, to name a few). This big book, designed by his daughter Jennifer is the authority on his life and career. It belongs on every designer’s shelf — especially those who fart out “minimalist movie posters” in half an hour and call it a day. Let the master show you how it’s really done.

Custom Lettering of the 40s and 50s by Rian Hughes

Its predecessor, Custom Lettering of the 60s and 70s made my list last year, and this prequel is just as wonderful a resource. Culled from advertising and other ephemera, there are thousands of different examples of lettering and calligraphy — all organized by style.

The Art of Pixar: The Complete Color Scripts and Select Art from 25 Years of Animation by Amid Amidi

A must-have for animation and illustration fans. Author Amid Amidi of Cartoon Brew has a solid track record, and even for their lesser films, these Pixar Art Of books, usually devoted to a single film, are always brimming with wonderful art. What sets this particular book apart is that it spans the studio’s entire catalog and reproduces each film’s colour script — a series of lush, colourful preliminary paintings that are to the emotion of an animated film what storyboards are to the action. When I had the privilege of visiting Pixar a few years ago there was an area literally wallpapered with the colour script from Wall-E and I could have stared at it all day.

Figure Drawing for All It’s Worth and Drawing the Head & Hands by Andrew Loomis

Titan Books re-released two books by master illustrator Andrew Loomis this year: Figure Drawing for All It’s Worth and Drawing the Head & Hands. Originally published in the 1940s, these how-to books are time capsules of the golden age of advertising illustration. Modernist, abstract and avant-garde illustration styles were nowhere to be seen, Photoshop was science fiction, and realism was king. These faithful reproductions are as much beautiful art objects as they are practical resources. They’re only missing that wonderful musty old book smell and brittle dust jackets, but if that’s what you’re looking for, original copies will probably set you back a few hundred dollars on eBay.

Scenes from an Impending Marriage by Adrian Tomine

From my original review:

Adrian Tomine’s Scenes from an Impending Marriage is a perfect little book. It chronicles the planning and build-up to Tomine’s wedding in comic strip form, and the occasional single panel gag.

Until now I have never really connected with Tomine’s work. But there is something just right about these little stories presented in a 9-panel grid. Reading the strips is a master class in cartooning. The figures and backgrounds are drawn with precision and masterful minimalism, the punchlines are timed just so, and the lettering and panel sizes are measured and considered to near perfection.

Tomine’s also released issue 12 of Optic Nerve this year, and it continues with this stripped-down comic strip style of cartooning.

Pinocchio by Winshluss

I nearly forgot to add this to my list, primarily because my copy is actually a few years old, and in French. But this English edition was released this year, and you really should snap this one up. It’s primarily wordless, which is why I have kept the French version, and it’s a master class in economical visual storytelling. Not a panel is wasted here in this modern retelling of Pinocchio in which he is, of course, a robot. It’s one of my favourite books period.

See also:

drawnblog:

I’ve been enjoying Douglas Coupland and Graham Roumieu’s Highly Inappropriate Tales for Young People. It’s a collection of short stories about miscreants and ne’er-do-wells, illustrated hilariously by Graham, who is probably most known for his laugh-out-loud funny Bigfoot books. It reminded me of how much I loved Roald Dahl’s The Twits as a kid, and all of the terrible things they did to each other.

I didn’t love every story (my favourite was Hans, the Weird Exchange Student) but whenever the narrative faltered, Graham’s illustrations amped up the funny. If you’ve read the Bigfoot books (or follow Bigfoot’s tweets) you know Graham is funny, but I am always envious of his ability to draw funny. His illustrations may appear dashed off, but their simplicity and energy only serves his funniness even further. He may very well be a spiritual successor to Quentin Blake, whose sketchy drawings decorated the pages of Roald Dahl’s books.

I also found it interesting that this book is not credited to Coupland as author and Roumieu as illustrator — but that they are both given equal credit. Certainly the illustrations add to the stories, and are as much a part of the reader’s experience as the words. We illustrators know that. But it’s nice to see the author/illustrator relationship treated as an equal collaboration on the book jacket itself.

fuckyeahbookarts:







(via sleepingjedi-deactivated2011032)

fuckyeahbookarts:

(via sleepingjedi-deactivated2011032)

drawnblog:

I’ll take a wild guess and say that because you’re reading this on a comics & illustration blog, you’re already familiar with Kate Beaton’s comics. I’ll also guess, since it’s been reviewed everywhere from NPR to Time Magazine that you also already know about her new book with Drawn & Quarterly, on sale today.
I’ll refrain from reviewing the book itself, which is a nice, big, beautiful, hilarious thing because there’s not much I can say that Dustin Harbin didn’t already put so perfectly in his review.
But I did want to draw attention to the book because I know that readers of this site are cartoonists themselves, both professional and aspiring.  Kate’s book, which topped the comics and graphic novel sales chart on Amazon well before it was even released, is a notable Internet success story, and it’s worth trying to steal her secrets.
Okay, yes, talent. Talent aside — and she has it in boatloads — I think Kate’s secret is in how thoughtful a cartoonist she is. It’s a thoughtfulness that informs her work, and gives her the observational skills that allows her to capture the expressions, emotions, body language, and speech patterns of real people that makes her comics about historical and literary characters so funny.
But if you know Kate, have seen her speak, or follow her on Twitter, you’ll know it’s her thoughtfulness that also gives her autobiographical comics such heart, her thoughtfulness that gives her opinions on comics, humour, art, and culture such weight, and her thoughtfulness that makes her fans love her:

Let’s all buy her book.
EDIT: Here’s our first post about Kate from 2007.

drawnblog:

I’ll take a wild guess and say that because you’re reading this on a comics & illustration blog, you’re already familiar with Kate Beaton’s comics. I’ll also guess, since it’s been reviewed everywhere from NPR to Time Magazine that you also already know about her new book with Drawn & Quarterly, on sale today.

I’ll refrain from reviewing the book itself, which is a nice, big, beautiful, hilarious thing because there’s not much I can say that Dustin Harbin didn’t already put so perfectly in his review.

But I did want to draw attention to the book because I know that readers of this site are cartoonists themselves, both professional and aspiring.  Kate’s book, which topped the comics and graphic novel sales chart on Amazon well before it was even released, is a notable Internet success story, and it’s worth trying to steal her secrets.

Okay, yes, talent. Talent aside — and she has it in boatloads — I think Kate’s secret is in how thoughtful a cartoonist she is. It’s a thoughtfulness that informs her work, and gives her the observational skills that allows her to capture the expressions, emotions, body language, and speech patterns of real people that makes her comics about historical and literary characters so funny.

But if you know Kate, have seen her speak, or follow her on Twitter, you’ll know it’s her thoughtfulness that also gives her autobiographical comics such heart, her thoughtfulness that gives her opinions on comics, humour, art, and culture such weight, and her thoughtfulness that makes her fans love her:

Let’s all buy her book.

EDIT: Here’s our first post about Kate from 2007.

onearth:

This is the world’s most authoritative atlas. It’s published every four years. This edition is full of changes that the editors were forced to make because of climate change — shrinking lakes, changing coastlines, and whole new islands exposed by melting glaciers. Find out more.

onearth:

This is the world’s most authoritative atlas. It’s published every four years. This edition is full of changes that the editors were forced to make because of climate change — shrinking lakes, changing coastlines, and whole new islands exposed by melting glaciers. Find out more.

(via poptech)

(via bookshelfporn)